January 28, 2005

Crapo: Work Continuing Despite Ricin Scare

But needed security checks will slow Senate mail

Boise - Idaho Senator Mike Crapo said today the discovery of a highly poisonous substance in the mailroom of the same building where his Washington, DC offices are located will slow mail processing and delay D.C. meetings due to related office closures. But he noted much of the business of the Senate is continuing as Senators are able to access the U.S. Capitol Building and are keeping in touch via electronic communications.â??We have seen many firsts in the nationâ??s capitol as of late. The first terrorist attack on the Pentagon, subsequent threats with anthrax sent through the mail, and now the incident related to ricin, a highly toxic poison, which thankfully has not harmed anyone in Senator Fristâ??s office or elsewhere through the Senate office complex,â?? Crapo said. â??The use of technology such as cell phones and wireless e-mail devices has allowed us to maintain communication, and we have been able to access the Capitol to maintain some floor activities to keep the Senate in business. Our in-state Senate district offices also are open for business,â?? Crapo added. â??I urge constituents to continue to contact my state offices and understand we are not yet sure when Washington can return to normal operations. It is a fact of life that terrorists are trying to make their presence felt and we as Americans will have to continue to deal with these threats by being vigilant, patient, and supportive of the necessary checks conducted by the Department of Homeland Security, the Transportation Security Administration, and the Postal Service.â??# # #FOR INTERESTED MEDIA: A radio actuality is available by calling 1-800-545-1267. Press 327 at any time during or after the greeting and instructions. You can also access the actuality through the Internet at www.senate.gov/src/radio/crapo.