Editorials

May 31, 2006

RE-DISCOVERING LEWIS AND CLARK

â??On September 1, 1805, the party set out, traveling cross-country over high, rugged hills, to todayâ??s North Fork of the Salmon Riverâ?¦They were entering mountains far more difficult to pass than any American had ever attemptedâ??steep and massive peaks thrust up by tectonic forces deep within the earth, thickly timbered in pineâ?¦The confusion of creeks and ravines cutting through deep mountainsides has made the route the expedition used the most disputed of the entire journey. Clark descri… Continue Reading


May 24, 2006

THE REASON FOR THE SEASON

Not for fame or reward, not for place or for rank, not lured by ambition or goaded by necessity, but in simple obedience to duty as they understood it, these men suffered all, sacrificed all, daredall, and died.-Inscription at Arlington National CemeteryIs the car packed? Someone taking care of the animals? Reservations made? Is the salad finished? Kids ready? Is there charcoal for the grill? Enough soda, chips and dip? These questions may sound familiar this time of year as we celebrate the Mem… Continue Reading


May 17, 2006

DON'T TALK TO (OR EMAIL) STRANGERS

Donâ??t talk to strangers. Most of us have heard these words time and again. In our cyber age, this advice takes a slightly different form, but the sentiment remains the same--we must teach our children to use the web safely and responsibly. 2003 Census data showed that 56 percent of Idaho households had Internet access. The Idaho Department of Commerce and Labor estimates a 10 percent increase since that time. With the State Legislatureâ??s recent approval of $5 million in matching funds for ru… Continue Reading


May 10, 2006

A TRIP TO OUR NATION'S CAPITAL

When visiting Washington, D.C., the White House, Washington Monument, Capitol, and the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials tend to be the main attractions to tourists. After spending considerable time here over the past 14 years, Iâ??ve learned about an entirely different Washington, one that includes these important monuments and memorials to our celebrated political and military history, but one that also caters to specific interests of many different people. The worldâ??s most-visited museum, the… Continue Reading


May 04, 2006

EDUCATION 2005

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May 03, 2006

HEROES AMONG US

On a chilly November day in Shelley in 1914, newly-hired Village Marshal Lafayette Hampton left his wife and two daughters to work his 17th day of duty. Little did his family know that their husband and father would not return home. Called to stop a robbery at a local shop, the 28-year-old marshal pursued the thief to the outskirts of town and was gunned down. Now, almost a century later, Hampton will be rightfully accorded a place of honor along with his fellow fallen officers at the National P… Continue Reading


April 27, 2006

SIGNS OF GROWTH

With recent upbeat news about the economy both in Idaho and nationwide, weâ??re hearing terms like unemployment rate, gross domestic product (GDP), durable goods, consumer confidence, housing starts and new home sales, to name a few. These different components of the overall economy, evaluated comprehensively, create an encouraging financial outlook. Idahoâ??s unemployment rate, the percentage of the population unemployed who actively looked for work, fell to 3.2 percent in March, the lowest sin… Continue Reading


April 19, 2006

HEALTHY FOODS = HEALTHY KIDS

FOR RELEASE CONTACT: Susan Wheeler (202) 224-5150Week of April 23, 2006 Laura Thurston Goodroe (202) 224-7500HEALTH = FRUIT AND VEGIES ²Guest opinion submitted by Idaho Senator Mike CrapoIn 2002, the Outdoor Industry Association ranked Idahoans, 16 and older, as top in the nation in percentage of the population participation in outdoor activities. It makes sense, considering the beauty and accessibility of our natural recreation resources and the many local and state initiatives which have furt… Continue Reading


April 12, 2006

FORMS FILING AND OTHER PERILS OF TAX SEASON

Around this time of year, you may feel a little like the man who, when he claimed the federal government as a dependent on his tax return, was disappointed when they disallowed the claim because he wasnâ??t contributing more than half his income to support it. In April, taxes can seem particularly onerous. With the tax cuts of 2001, 2003 and 2004 still in effect, 75 percent of federal taxpayers fall in tax brackets of 10 to 25 percent. While these cuts have contributed to significant economic gr… Continue Reading


April 05, 2006

NEEDED: A RATIONAL APPROACH TO IMMIGRATION

Our national character includes two abiding principles: one, we are a nation of immigrants; and two, we live under a peaceful system that upholds the rule of law. Within our borders, every culture and ethnicity in the world is represented. Almost all who live here can easily trace their ancestry to a foreign country, often with great pride. For most, this pride is integral to, not in conflict with our American citizenship. Our political and economic stability is rooted in a deep, very American r… Continue Reading


March 22, 2006

SECURING SOCIAL SECURITY

During the recent debate in the Senate over the federal budget, Senator Jim DeMint (R-South Carolina) and I introduced an amendment that would stop the United States government from raiding the so-called Social Security Trust Fund. I highlight the term â??Trust Fundâ?? because itâ??s misleading. Every year the federal government uses the surplus deposited into the Old Age Survivors and Disability Income (OASDI), more commonly referred to as Social Security, to cover expenses incurred in other go… Continue Reading


March 15, 2006

A WILD RIDE

While she was putting her eleven younger siblings to bed, word reached the house: the British were burning Danbury, Connecticut, 25 miles away. Sixteen-year-old Sybilâ??s father was colonel of the local militia and his men lived throughout a wide area around their hometown of Fredericksburg, New York. The responsible young patriot knew what to do. Convincing her father to let her go, Sybil rode her horse 40 miles that dark April night in 1777 to sound the alarm. The men she roused from sleep arr… Continue Reading


March 08, 2006

CARING FOR COMMUNITY

The grass is not always greener on the other side of the fence. Fences have nothing to do with it. The grass is greenest where it is watered.Moral: When crossing over fences, carry water with you and tend the grass wherever you may be.-Robert Fulghum (1937- ) American writerFebruary is a month associated primarily with Valentines Day--a time when many of us share love, friendship and encouragement with family and friends. It is a time when caring for others is at the forefront of our thoughts an… Continue Reading


March 08, 2006

THE METH MONSTER

She was sixteen--the age when many teenage girls are involved sports, music, school, church, close friendships and first dates. This would have been her... Was it just a year ago, maybe 18 months? How things had changed--standing in the county jail, eyes sunken, hair patchy, skin covered in open sores, rail thin, waiting for her brand-new baby to be taken for medical care for methamphetamine addiction and then foster care. What had she done? It was just a little hit less than two years agoâ?¦Thi… Continue Reading


March 08, 2006

UPON CLOSER REVIEW...

English historian Arnold Toynbee wryly observed, â??America is like a large, friendly dog in a very small room. Every time it wags its tail, it knocks over a chair.â?? Notwithstanding Toynbeeâ??s conceit, he alludes to an indisputable truism: when America takes military or economic action, at home or abroad, the rest of the world is affected. Our grand history has prepared us for this role and means that our nation carries a responsibility regarding to world affairs and stability. United States&… Continue Reading


February 15, 2006

MEETING ENROLLMENT CHALLENGES HEAD-ON

â??At present, two worries are paramount. That despite publicity and government educational efforts, many of those participating remain in the dark about what it will and will not coverâ?¦As to the first problem, it is perhaps unavoidable that some persons remain uninformed despite good intentions and earnest efforts. Whatever the arguments have been and will be against it, Medicare deserves a fair trial.â?? San Angelo Standard-Times This observation is a little dated--almost forty years to be e… Continue Reading


February 08, 2006

BUDGETING FOR SECURITY AND EFFICIENCY

Prioritization is key to responsible personal and business budgeting. Financial needs should be carefully examined keeping in mind current realities and the longer view over years. Funding sources must be evaluated for their reliability. When it comes to the federal budget, the process gets even more complicated. Priorities must be established. Tough fiscal realities face us at all levels, dictating allocation of scarce federal funding resources. Unlike employment or business income these source… Continue Reading


February 01, 2006

" A TIME OF CONSEQUENCE "

Times of testing and trial reveal a number of truths. Character becomes evident. Priorities are defined. Hearts are revealed for what lies beneath the surface. Leaders emerge, as well as those willing to follow with wisdom, discernment and honesty. President Bush called this time in history â??a time of consequence.â?? Never easy, choices made now, as he told our nation in the annual State of the Union address, define Americaâ??s future at home and abroad.We choose courage in the ongoing battle … Continue Reading


January 25, 2006

DID YOU KNOW?

According to national research, thereâ??s a very real chance that about one-third of teenage girls in high school or middle school have been hit, punched or kicked by a boyfriend. Itâ??s highly likely that this violence didnâ??t just come out of the blue, and that verbal and emotional abuse preceded these attacks. If youâ??re a parent, are you aware that this happens regularly? Did you know that boys are also victims of dating violence? Did you know that teen dating violence has ended in death, … Continue Reading


January 18, 2006

IMPROVING THE ESA FOR SPECIES AND PEOPLE

For years now, landowners, environmentalists and state and federal agencies responsible for implementation and enforcement of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) have been working to improve the Act. The status quo is not producing the best possible outcome for species or people. And although stakeholders continue to advocate for meaningful improvements, the stalemate goes on. In the meantime, the survival of one species after another, and one ranch or farm after another is called into question. Th… Continue Reading

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